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Old 17-04-2014, 10:58
AkMike AkMike is offline
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Default Russian Duma Bill Ending Mayoral Elections

We WILL decide how to vote for you!


The State Duma has approved in a first reading a bill that would put an end to direct mayoral elections in some of Russia's largest cities in what critics said was an attempt to ensure the appointment of mayors loyal to the Kremlin.

The bill was approved Tuesday by 237 Duma deputies, 11 more than the minimum needed. If passed into law, choosing city heads would become the prerogative of the city legislature, itself selected from the members of the directly elected regional Duma.

According to the bill, proposed by the ruling United Russia party and opposed by other State Duma parties with the exception of the nationalist LDPR, regional authorities would also win the right to remove city heads.

The bill would not affect mayoral elections in Russia's two biggest cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg, which are classified as subjects of Russia rather than regional centers, the BBC's Russian Service reported.

Politicians from other parties represented in the Duma, most of which are generally loyal to the Kremlin, have criticized the bill as taking the power of self-determination out of the hands of voters. Dmitry Gudkov, a State Duma deputy formerly of the Just Russia party, was quoted by Gazeta.ru as accusing his fellow lawmakers of hypocrisy, saying that while Russia was demanding that Ukraine hold direct mayoral and gubernatorial elections, it was canceling its own local elections.

The bill's authors said the measure would make city government more accessible to ordinary Russians, in keeping with a suggestion made by President Vladimir Putin in a speech to a joint session of both houses of the Russian parliament last month.

LDPR deputy Sergei Karginov defended the bill by citing a low turnout in local elections and said that the system works better when left to political parties.

"People get tired of elections, people do not want elections," he said, Gazeta.ru reported.

Non-Duma opposition leader Alexei Navalny took issue with Karginov's statements on his website Wednesday. The anti-corruption blogger said that the law amounted to State Duma deputies saying that Russians are "too stupid and irresponsible" to vote in elections.

Navalny, who formally garnered nearly 30 percent of the vote in last year's election for Moscow mayor, said that the "real front for the defense of Russians" was not in Ukraine — despite official statements about the need to defend the interests of Russian speakers there — but in Russia itself.

Other analysts said that United Russia and LDPR supported the bill to try to stop the kind of conflicts between regional authorities and city mayors that have resulted after mayoral elections brought opposition politicians to power. Recent opposition victories in Russia's regions include Civil Platform party's Yevgeny Roizman capturing the Yekaterinburg mayorship last year and Communist Party candidate Anatoly Lokot's win in Novosibirsk earlier this month.

"The authorities have realized that the process of losing power in the regions is not going to stop," Ilya Ponomaryov, an opposition Duma deputy from Novosibirsk who backed out of the city's mayoral election to consolidate anti-United Russia support behind Lokot, told The Moscow Times.

"[They realize] that the opposition is going to grow and grow."

The deputy was not optimistic about the future of the opposition in Russia's regions, however, saying that the bill would "of course" be adopted and that it only remained to work out the details of its formulation.

Ponomaryov said the bill would prevent future opposition victories and added that if the bill is passed in its current form, under which regional authorities would win the right to dismiss the city mayor, some elected mayors could lose their posts over the next few months.

Direct gubernatorial elections were restored in 2012, having been scrapped by Putin back in 2004.

http://www.themoscowtimes.com/news/a...ng/498195.html
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Old 17-04-2014, 11:04
AkMike AkMike is offline
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Ilya Ponomaryov is spot on about the future of regional elections. This bill ensures one party rule, the United Russia party of President Putin. The reason for declining vote turnout is that the average citizen understands what most outsiders don't--the important elections are rigged and don't really mean anything.

This paves the way for a one party rule so no one else can have a voice in their country.
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Old 17-04-2014, 11:51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AkMike View Post
Ilya Ponomaryov is spot on about the future of regional elections. This bill ensures one party rule, the United Russia party of President Putin. The reason for declining vote turnout is that the average citizen understands what most outsiders don't--the important elections are rigged and don't really mean anything.

This paves the way for a one party rule so no one else can have a voice in their country.
Mike .

It is your opinion about this subjekt but frankly i think it is stupid and secund of alle who cares about it ? It is Russias internal problems and not ours but it looks like you are as the same as the stupid Americans who think Thye are the Wolds police and can ruel the hole World becours Thye say so . how many wars have Thye not got in to and mengelt in to some thing ther non of ther business ? Amerika shut mind its own business and use its energy on its own citezens first before all others, it has no right to stik its nose in to all other counties business .
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Old 17-04-2014, 12:08
AkMike AkMike is offline
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I voiced my opinion and that of others.

As per the rules it cannot be discussed. As I understand these rules you cannot have any dialog between members just comment.

There was no mention of failed USA foreign policies mentioned in this approved news article.
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Old 17-04-2014, 12:29
Karl Karl is offline
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I do disagree Astra 16V, I find it interesting to read about the democratic development in all the eastern European countries,, including Russia.
I will not be able to judge if any democratic process in Russia are rigged, unless it goes Putins way.
But I am a strong believer in, as much democracy as possible, to the citizen who will carry the consequences of it. So I do find it disturbing when important public positions are filled without influence from the people.
You can argue that the problem is the same in U.S.A, people have the right to vote, but they do not use it.
Secondly I will agree with Astra 16 V, it is disturbing when U.S.A try to influence the directions in an independent country, it is not a good solution.
This is why I am also a strong opponent to Russias interferens in Ukraines internal affairs
on Crimea.
Finally will I like to ask, if Astra 16 V's feel his contribution to this thread is in accordance with forum guidelines part 1&2.

Happy Easter to all

Karl
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